Don’t Believe Your Mind

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Clean out the Wound

Clean out the Wound

 

“You cannot solve these problems or ignore them.  You have to outgrow them, and that requires noticing them.  Much like an abscess, the wound must be cleaned out if healing is to occur.”

“When you think you have the answers, it’s hard to hear alternatives.”

I come here to think which means I come here to notice what I am up to.  Our minds/brains lie to us, constantly.  Even though this is not new information to me, I watched a clip from Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday this morning that reminded me of this truth yet again.  It was a point reiterated by Eckhart Tolle when the question was posed: how do you silence that vicious voice in your head that keeps you up at night?

Don’t believe your mind!

It is basis of Byron Katie’s work; the foundation of four questions she poses to help people notice how their minds are lying to them.  Why do we believe our own thoughts?

In a condition known as hemineglect, stroke victims disown the half of their bodies that is no longer mobile and according to Omar Manejwala in his book Craving: Why We Can’t Seem to Get Enough, in severe cases the patient may deny that his own arm belongs to him.  There are, in fact many medical conditions whose symptoms are the direct result of believing thoughts that aren’t true.  Clerambault’s syndrome, also known as erotomania is a condition where a person, often a young woman believes that a person, often a man of high social status (think David Letterman and Margaret May Ray) is madly in love with her (despite the that fact that often he is unaware she exists, at least initially).   Schizophrenics are plagued by auditory and/or visual hallucinations.  But we don’t need to be ill to suffer thoughts that are simply not true.  All of us have brains that lie to us all the time.

Our brains extrapolate.  They fill in the blanks with information that “should” be there, but isn’t actually seen. It’s why optical illusions work.  In this “stepping feet” optical illusion, it seems as if the squares are stepping when the lines are in the background.  They aren’t, of course.

If you watch this video, you will see a multitude of “illusions” that illustrate ways the brain lies to us.

Don’t believe your mind.

I contemplate these things because so often, when I have a thought, the temptation is to believe the lies my brain is telling me.

Question your thoughts.  Weed out your preconceived notions.  There’s a good chance your mind is lying to you.

Namaste, my friends, Namaste.

Don't Believe Your Mind

Don’t Believe Your Mind

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